Litographs

Litographs.com

In Wuthering Heights the reader is shocked, disgusted, almost sickened by details of cruelty, inhumanity, and the most diabolical hate and vengeance, and anon come passages of powerful testimony to the supreme power of love—even over demons in the human form. The women in the book are of a strange fiendish-angelic nature, tantalising, and terrible, and the men are indescribable out of the book itself. Yet, towards the close of the story occurs the following pretty, soft picture, which comes like the rainbow after a storm.

A review of Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights (published January 15, 1848). (via the-library-and-step-on-it)
Happy birthday to Charlotte Bronte! See our Jane Eyre collection here.
Happy birthday to Charlotte Bronte! See our Jane Eyre collection here.
Happy birthday to Charlotte Bronte! See our Jane Eyre collection here.

Happy birthday to Charlotte Bronte! See our Jane Eyre collection here.

Having begun to love you, I love you for ever - in all changes, in all disgraces, because you are yourself. I ask no more.

littlebrown:

bartlettsquotes:

RIP #GabrielGarciaMarquez

We’re remembering a great writer today.

littlebrown:

bartlettsquotes:

RIP #GabrielGarciaMarquez

We’re remembering a great writer today.

What makes a city great for readers and writers?

image

I’m not big on lists unless there is substantial evidence to back up ranking metrics. To their credit, MyLife.com did a great job explaining their reasoning for the 10 Best Cities to be a Writer

That’s all well and good, but are you going to move to the St. Louis, the land of opportunity, just because it ranked #1? Probably not. If you’re staying put, here are a few things that you’ll need and probably already have. 

1 Bookstore

Wouldn’t it be great to plan bar crawls that really went to bookstores because there are so many in your city that you can’t walk down the street without seeing a sign for one and you could fill up on knowledge and heroic prose instead of gin & tonic? Yes, that would be amazing. Are you drinking gin right now, though, instead of planning your book adventure? Probably. 

Even if bookstores were as plentiful as Starbucks, we’d probably find one we liked (read: the closest one) and give it all of our time and money, kind of like a puppy.

image

4 Seasons

You need the depths of winter as well as the promise of spring to be able to write characters who are optimistic as well as the character based on “Judy,” the office rules stickler no one can stand.

Coffee. All of it.

Or tea. Or juice. Or dunkaroos. But definitely not Red Bull. Whatever makes you tick can surely be replicated anywhere. 

So, you see, it might sound like a distant city could propel your writing, but the truth is, you need your roots and your experiences and your mailman and all the people who make your life simultaneously great and miserable because it all boils down to the what you write best. 

What makes your city great for reading and writing?

theparisreview:

“We Americans share more than what divides us.”
For National Library Week, a photographic essay by Robert Dawson on America’s public libraries.
theparisreview:

“We Americans share more than what divides us.”
For National Library Week, a photographic essay by Robert Dawson on America’s public libraries.

theparisreview:

“We Americans share more than what divides us.”

For National Library Week, a photographic essay by Robert Dawson on America’s public libraries.

National Library Week

image

It’s been a few months since I’ve made it to my local library, but National Library Week reminds me that it’s high time that I made it back. 

I’ve never used the library as my source for new books because it’s stiff competition to get at the top of a waiting list for a high-profile new release. Besides, it’s more fun to experience the roulette-like feeling of walking into a library with a few titles or authors in mind and seeing if my numbers come up. 

image

I’m not sure how my library feels about dancing in the stacks, but I know there are a good many librarians out there who are encouraging the use of their libraries for nontraditional means like aerobics classes.

Are you visiting the library this week? Are you checking out a novel to read for pleasure or using the myriad other resources?

I had rather be shut up in a very modest cottage, with my books, my family, and a few old friends, dining on simple bacon, and letting the world roll on as it liked, than to occupy the most splendid post which any human power can give.

Thomas Jefferson, born this day in 1743
Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary was published on this day in 1857. See our whole MB collection here.

Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary was published on this day in 1857. See our whole MB collection here.